NEIGHBORS

 

The stories and actions of North End Residents

 

Gathered by: Steve Pavey

 

“I love our neighborhood.  I especially love Common Good and Embrace, they are like family and so important for my children.   Life here is better than where we came from, the violence.  I know where my children are and what’s around them here.”

 

“I’m really worried about the development happening around where we live.  Houses and buildings are being bought up and friends of ours are being kicked out.  They cannot stay because it now costs too much to live there after they are fixed up.  I have to rent and we like our place, but I’m worried we will have to move and leave this neighborhood.”

 

“I want to own my own home, but I can’t because I don’t have papers.  I have the money, I just cannot get a loan.”

 

Interview with an undocumented Latinx family living in the neighborhood 8+ years

 
 
 
 
 

“Coach Roach was one of the best coaches ever and also he had more integrity in his pinky finger than I do in my whole body . . . now that’s a guy we need to have a statue for somewhere.  Growing up, there were two names spoke highly of in the neighborhood, Roach and Peeples, that stood up for black people.  Peeples was our Martin Luther King.”

 

Interview with a white man in his 60s who grew up in the neighborhood, remembering desegregation and the Dunbar School on Upper Street

 
 

Neighbors planting trees for each other.

 
 
 

“I walk my dog regularly in the park (Duncan).  As an older person, I wish there were benches I could sit down on and rest.”

 

Interview with a long-time white resident in her 70s

 
 
 
 

Neighbors listening to each other.

 
 
 
 
 

“I am really glad to see a place like Wild Fig come into the neighborhood.  We need more places like this.”

 

Interview with a long-time black resident in her late 60s

 
 

Neighbors talking over a bonfire.

 
 

“Duncan Park is too dark at night, even along the street walking at night.  It needs lighting.”

Interview with a white man in his 60s who grew up in the neighborhood

 
 

Neighbors chatting at the Castlewood Fresh Stop Market.

 
 

“Things are changing, maybe not for the better.  But I’ve always felt safe in this neighborhood as long as you stayed out of trouble.”

Interview with a white man in his 60s who grew up in the neighborhood

 
 

Neighbors taking care of the North Pole Community Garden.

 
 
 
 
 

“Here is what I really want to say to the developers.  I like that the property values are rising and things are looking better around here, but they need to know that a lot of us have been living around here for a long time, long before they moved in here.  And they need to know that many of us lived on fixed incomes and we do not have all the money to fix things up like we would like.  So please stop complaining about us to code enforcement and stop harassing us to get our properties.  Please believe that we are doing the best that we can.  They need to know that we have emotional attachment to our properties.  We love our homes and our community.  So stop harassing us to get our properties just for money.  People that have been living here for a long time deserve more respect.  We can live together.  I really appreciate the diversity in the neighborhood.  We don’t have to look like or make all our properties look alike.”

 

Interview with a long-time black resident in her late 60s

 

“I don’t have a problem with people calling it something new, but I do have a problem with people forgetting our history, that people lived in what I still call Brucetown and the Meadows.”

 

Interview with a long-time black resident in her late 60s